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River Ouse & Tributaries (Yorks)

River Ouse, Yorkshire - Moorings, Riverside Pubs, Boat Hire and River Holidays. 

The tabs above will give you information you need for the planning of your River Ouse boating holiday, cycle route, towpath walk or favourite fishing spots with the river guide being printable to use while on your journey. Using information through our River Ouse guide, River Ouse map and photo galleries we can help you find boat hire bases, mooring spots, places to eat at riverside pubs and restaurants, towns, villages and landmarks of interest. Information of all kinds is added all the time so if you can’t find some information at this time be assured that we are working hard to get it on the site as soon as we can.

The River Ouse and its tributaries are responsible for carrying the sometimes considerable amount of water from the Yorkshire Dales to converge with the River Trent just before the Humber Estuary as such the river can be feisty after heavy rainfall in the Dales. The Ouse Valley is a wide flat plain and prone to severe flooding as the river only drops ten metres from Linton-on-Ouse to the Humber Estuary. To compound the trickiness in navigating this river it is tidal in its lower reaches all the way to Naburn Locks, a short distance south of York. The rewards to the skilled, well equipped and experienced boater that navigate the sixty miles of the Yorkshire Ouse is not only the glorious city of York but the many other historical sites and towns that punctuate the flow of this wide river between vast wilderness, heathland, water meadows and woodland through what is proudly named by people of Yorkshire as “God’s country”.

Waterways Leisure is a valuable resource for information on canal pubs, barge hire and places to eat and drink. In addition we also offer a range of country clothing and country wear and clothing which is suitable to be embroidered with our top embroidery service.

 

Canals and rivers with links to the River Ouse and Tributaries:

River Humber; River Trent and Beeston Canal; Aire and Calder Navigation

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The Following River Ouse, Yorkshire Guide is not only a guide for people on boat holidays but is written to be just as handy for activities along the riverbank and for people lucky enough to be boat owners with information of attractions, highlights, land marks, mooring spots, marina’s, food shops, riverside pubs and other places to eat in the settlements along the Yorkshire River Ouse. Both the river map and river guide can be printed off by clicking the icon on the right to be taken with you as you enjoy your time on the River Ouse, Yorkshire.

The River Ouse and its tributaries are responsible for carrying the sometimes considerable amount of water from the Yorkshire Dales to converge with the River Trent just before the Humber Estuary as such the river can be feisty after heavy rainfall in the Dales. The Ouse Valley is a wide flat plain and prone to severe flooding as the river only drops ten metres from Linton-on-Ouse to the Humber Estuary. To compound the trickiness in navigating this river it is tidal in its lower reaches all the way to Naburn Locks, a short distance south of York. The rewards to the skilled, well equipped and experienced boater that navigate the sixty miles of the Yorkshire Ouse is not only the glorious city of York but the many other historical sites and towns that punctuate the flow of this wide river between vast wilderness, heathland, water meadows and woodland through what is proudly named by people of Yorkshire as “God’s country”.

Most cruisers would access the Yorkshire Ouse via the Aire and Calder Navigation and its link in Goole or Selby, giving access from the Leeds and Liverpool, Calder and Hebble and Sheffield and South Yorkshire Canals, going via Selby cuts out much of the tidal section of the river but is still by no means a route to be taken lightly. Access can also be gained via the Trent at Trent Falls in the Humber Estuary but as with all estuaries this is treacherous even for sea faring vessels, given all these factors most opt for Selby.

From the Trent Falls to the Aire and Calder Junction in Goole is an eight mile stretch of tidal water that takes cruisers past predominantly rich arable fields punctuated by small charming villages such as Blacktoft and Swinefleet. Goole is a flat lying town set on the west side of a sharp meander of the river and the Aire and Calder to the south, it contains an active dock area and a large boatyard hosting a myriad of boats, there is a large supermarket here to stock up on essentials and some open parkland to enjoy. Hook, which is an outlying area of Goole, lies alongside the river slightly to the north which has a fair choice of places to eat and drink considering its size.

After passing under the M62 things quieten down considerably as the river heads off towards Selby, pockets of woodland occupy the inside of meanders in the river, but overall there are mostly fields full of crops to each side with a thin line of trees to each bank. Barmby on the Marsh lies about half way between Goole and Selby at the convergence with the Derwent, it lies a little way towards the north and is a pleasant little place hemmed in by fields with a local pub and little else.

The entrance into Selby is hardly awe inspiring with the large scale industrial units and some fairly unimpressive bridges but there are some fine sights to be had in the town, the abbey for one is a singularly impressive building, and the surrounding park area and leafy residential roads are pleasant enough. The Aire and Calder joins before the sharp turn in the river from the south providing an excellent place to moor up after the pound from Goole.

Selby takes a little while to shake off with the nearby town of Barlby flanking the river to the right but before long the river pitches headlong into wide open arable country, once again devoid of interference of busy nearby roads, railways or people in general as the river makes huge sweeping meandering turns as it criss crosses the flood plain. Moor End to the right and Cawood closer to the left bank come in quick succession offering willow tree lined banks and a nice swing bridge north of which is the joining of another sizeable tributary, the Wharfe.

After another few miles of twists and turns through the now very familiar arable flatlands we finally come to Naburn Locks, a little south of York and the end of the lengthy tidal section of the cruise. There is a sizeable island and plenty of signage separating the locks from the considerable weir at Naburn. The village of Naburn lies a little way around the corner from the locks and has plenty of spots for mooring which is something of a rarity on the Yorkshire Ouse. Should you need services, a place to eat and drink or some provisions, all can be found here, it caters very well to users of the river.

Settlements bordering the river come thick and fast as the river nears York. Bishopthorpe is easy to identify from the river as on its northern edge has the most fantastic riverside palace used by Archbishops of York for over 750 years. A couple of times a year the palace holds village fêtes and the like so with a little pre-planning your trip could coincide with a public function to really enjoy the grounds and a friendly local party atmosphere.

The river goes under the busy A64 heading northbound going through wooded areas and fields past Fulford on the southern fringes of York. Parkland lines the route into York and even the centre and beyond there seems no shortage of open areas. 48 hour visitor moorings can be found between Scarborough Railway Bridge and Lendal Bridge which is a convenient location for easy exploration of the city, this section of river can get busy with tour boats and the like. There is a lot to cram into 48 hours in York, other than the cathedral, the abbey, a railway museum, the castle and the never ending network of winding streets that contains markets and every kind of shop, pub and restaurant. The Shambles could take 48 hours to explore properly on its own.

After crossing under the A1237 the fantastically named Nether Poppleton marks the northern limit of York, a few miles of uninterrupted countryside later the river arrives at the small village of Beningbrough on the right and Nun Monkton on the left set in a wooded glade reaching down to the river where the River Nidd joins the Ouse. The fly fishing down the Nidd is supposedly exceptional and there are some terrific spots for walking, however the River Nidd is not the highlight of this small section of river as opposite Nun Monkton lies Beningbrough Hall and gardens, this fine Georgian mansion boasting an opulent baroque interior and over a hundred paintings loaned from the National Portrait Gallery in London.

A little further upstream lies Newton on Ouse which is a charming small village set on the outer edge of a meander in the river with an outstanding church, tree lined roads, a fine village green and a chance to eat and drink at a local pub.

A short distance further on lies Linton Locks set in a wide section of river flanked by trees overlooking the island that separates the sizeable weir and the cut housing the lock. There are moorings here to explore the wooded areas beyond and this is effectively the upper reaches of the navigable Ouse where the River Swale meets the River Ure. Time to head back down river and revisit the many fine sights, towns and areas on the way back to the great choice of canals and rivers accessible by the Aire and Calder Navigation.

Waterways Leisure is a valuable resource for information on canal pubs, barge hire and places to eat and drink. In addition we also offer a range of country clothing and country wear and clothing which is suitable to be embroidered with our top embroidery service.